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Stone Hollow Farmstead is an artisan farm located in Harpersville, Alabama.  Stone Hollow produces dairy and creamery products, along with canned goods, eggs, fresh flowers, herbs, skin care, and more.

Tuesday Table

SPRING 2018, WEEK 11

Michael Celozzi


A Salad of Late Spring

We’ve been lucky to offer some beautiful Hothouse Beefsteak Tomatoes from Greenleaf Nursery in Joppa, Alabama in the CSA. They were lovely harbingers of the jewels of summer – fruit that is already set on the vine in nearby Sand Mountain and Mentone, ripening as we speak. Until they are ready to harvest – and we don’t want to do so a moment too soon – we have late spring produce to make the most of.

This week we see Tuscan kale and candy cane beets (also known as Chioggia beets), as well as some broccoli Calabrese, carrots and radishes. Kale lovers already know how to make the most of these vitamin-K-rich leaves (we’re partial to bruising them a bit with some fresh crushed garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, serving with a healthy grating of fresh Parmesan). Come to think of it, the broccoli might like that same treatment, maybe after blanching for a quick minute.  Carrots and radishes love the heat too (yes, roasted radishes! Recipe), but when it comes to showing off those beets, see what you can think of that does not involve heat.

The Chioggia beets are so gorgeous on their own, but heat causes those red and white lines to blur into a sweet pinky hue so try and serve them raw if possible. Pull out that mandolin (a super-sharp and sturdy vegetable peeler will suffice) to shave off the thinnest of slices. These beets are a tiny bit sweeter than the traditional variety but still have that earthy flavor we’re familiar with. Citrus is the perfect balance here, so why not pick up a jar of our Calamondin preserves while you are in the shop? Arrange the beet slices on a plate and top with a ¼ - ½ tsp. of the preserves, per slice. Scatter with creamy chunks of our goat cheese, a little olive oil, salt and pepper. Add a hint of green to the plate in the form of fresh minced herbs (thyme, Italian parsley, or chives would love to join in here) and you’ll have one of the prettiest salads/appetizers of the season.

We’d love to see what new ways YOU come up with to enjoy your Stone Hollow Farmstead CSA this week. Make sure you tag us in your Instagram pics with #SHFCSA. ENJOY!


WHAT'S IN THE BAG


A complete list of the contents of the CSA share this week

From Friends

  • Radishes - Heron Hollow Farm / Maplesville, Alabama
  • Varied Tomatoes - Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • Red Spring Onions - Hamm Farms / Cullman, Alabama
  • White Spring Onions - Hamm Farms / Cullman, Alabama
  • Candy Stripe Beets - Hamm Farms / Cullman, Alabama
  • Strawberries - Mountain View Orchards / Jemison, Alabama
  • Lacinato Kale - Belle Meadow Farms / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Shiitake Mushrooms - Grandview Farms / Montevallo, Alabama
  • Fresh Pasta Noodle Sheet - Hinkel's / Birmingham, Alabama - keep refrigerated until ready to use; cut in desired shapes (tagliatelle, lasagna cut to the size of your pan, garganelli, or ravioli); keep surface and hands well floured while using egg wash to seal ravioli; there's no need to pre-boil pasta for lasagna, just use a decent amount of sauce and bake for at least 1 hour; for pastas, cook in boiling water for 2 minutes; more info: Hand Cut Pasta

From Stone Hollow

  • White Turnips
  • Baby Carrots
  • Arugula
  • Mesclun Salad Mix
  • Broccoli Calabrese
  • Nasturtium Flowers

Milk Share

  • Working Cow Dairy / Slocomb, Alabama

Cheese and/or Yogurt

  • French Style Brie - Marin French Cheese Company / Petaluma, California


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SPRING 2018, WEEK 10

Michael Celozzi


On Sour Milk

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Buttermilk makes another strong showing in the CSA this week. Depending on the type of buttermilk you grew up with, you might read this with either a wince (“what am I going to do with MORE buttermilk?”) or a quick fist pull to the waist (“YES! Woo-Hoo!”). For the uninitiated, or the ones who grew up with that thin, pallid liquid version buried deep in your grocer’s refrigerated section, you may wonder what the allure is of this fresh dairy staple. But to those who’ve had the pleasure of tasting the fresh, thick, creamy buttermilk that comes from happy Jersey cows, you know the delight that comes from drinking it straight from the jug. It coats your top lip and you can practically taste the emerald grass those cows lazed about in.

This is the kind of buttermilk in your CSA. And we promise you can taste the difference.

In The Animal Farm Buttermilk Cookbook (2013, Andrews McNeel) by Diane St. Clair, the author offers a wealth of recipes that employ the use of this liquid, from a variety of cultures: Indian, South African, Macedonian, Iranian, and Nordic. Buttermilk breaks the language barrier as it plays an integral role in lassi, filmjolk, surmelk, tykmaelk, and doogh. The powerful lactic acid tames the heat of spicy food, softens the toughest of cuts of meat, and leavens mere flour to become an ethereal biscuit. Reading on, St. Clair says it seems there is almost nothing buttermilk cannot do: from soothing colitis or oral thrush, to healing canker sores and killing off stubborn parasites. She also suggests adding four cups buttermilk to a warm bath with a little lavender oil for a smoothing sensory experience. And a cold buttermilk compress has been known to take the sting out of many an unwanted sunburn.

 

We hope you feel inspired to try something new with your buttermilk share this week. If you are still in need of inspiration, try the following St. Clair’s recipe.

Harissa Buttermilk Dressing

(makes ¾ cup dressing).

WHISK TOGETHER

  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ¼ cup good mayonnaise
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • 1 tablespoon harissa
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • season to taste with salt and pepper

 

Looking for something sweet? Try your hand at this recipe from Angie Mosier (as found in the Buttermilk Short Stack, volume 4, All Day Press, 2013).

Peach Cobbler

(serves 6)

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter at room temperature plus 3 tablespoons unsalted butter melted
  • 4 cups (about 1.5 pounds) peeled and sliced peaches
  • grated zest of one lemon
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • ½ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp. cornstarch
  • ½ cup sugar, divided
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp. sugar

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 375*F. Rub the 2 tablespoons softened butter into an 8-inch-square baking dish.

In a mixing bowl, combine the peaches, lemon zest, lemon juice, cinnamon, cornstarch and ¼ cup of the sugar, tossing with your hands until the peaches are coated evenly. Pour the peach mixture into the baking dish.

In another bowl, combine the remaining ¼ cup of sugar, flour, salt, baking powder and buttermilk and stir together with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula until just incorporated.  Pour the batter over the peaches, covering them and allowing the batter to drip down into the crevices. Drizzle the 3 tablespoons of melted butter over the batter, then sprinkle with the 2 tablespoons of sugar. Bake on the center rack of the oven for about 45 minutes or until the top is golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Serve immediately (the cobbler taste best when it’s still hot). A scoop of ice cream on top would be an excellent idea.


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WHAT'S IN THE BAG


A complete list of the contents of the CSA share this week

From Friends

  • Hothouse Cucumbers - Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • English Peas - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Fingerling Potatoes - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Shallots - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Cured Vidalia Onions - Valdosta, Georgia
  • Strawberries - Mountain View Orchards / Jemison, Alabama
  • Early Flavor Rich Peaches - Penton Farms / Chilton County, Alabama

From Stone Hollow

  • Baby Carrots
  • Flat Leaf Parsley
  • Cow's Milk Yogurt
  • Arugula
  • Tokyo Bekana Greens
  • Nasturtium Flowers
  • Herbs (garlic chives, chocolate mint, thyme)
  • Assorted Radishes
  • Buttermilk
  • Hen Eggs
  • Goat Cheese

Milk Share

  • Stone Hollow Farmstead / Harpersville, Alabama

Cheese and/or Yogurt

  • 12 mo. Manchego - Gran Valle de Montecelo / la Mancha, Spain

Flowers

  • Snapdragons
  • Bells of Ireland
  • Wild Bergamot
  • Queen Anne's Lace
  • Feverfew
  • Various Mint

Recipes We Love From People We Trust

In honor of Highlands Bar and Grill's James Beard Award last night for Nation's Most Outstanding Restaurant, we want to share a recipe from Frank Stitt's Southern Table (2004, Artisan).

Buttermilk Vinaigrette

(makes about 1 cup)

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tbsp. white wine vinegar or cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • ½ small shallot, finely minced
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ⅓ cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp. sour cream
  • 2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

DIRECTIONS

In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, lemon juice, shallot, and salt and pepper. Slowly whisk in the buttermilk, mayonnaise, and sour cream. Slowly whisk in the olive oil. Taste and adjust the seasoning. 

 

Additional Recipes

Buttermilk Cluster

Strawberry Peach Buttermilk Scones

Strawberry Peach Buttermilk Cake w/ Mascarpone Whipped Cream

Peach, Strawberry + Arugula Salad w/ Brown Sugar Balsamic Vinaigrette

Braised Fingerlings w/ Garlic, Shallots + Fresh Herbs

Warm Potato Arugula Salad

Roasted Fingerling Potato Crisps w/ Shallots + Rosemary - or try w/ thyme and/or chives

Grain Salad w/ English Peas, Cucumbers + Arugula

Spring Pea, Chive + Egg Toast

Couscous w/ Lemon, Peas + Chives

Pea Soup w/ Chives

Green Pea Cucumber Rum Cooler

Roasted Carrots w/ Turmeric + Cumin

Roasted Carrots w/ Parsley Yogurt Sauce

Cucumber Radish Salad w/ Harissa Yogurt

Radish + Cucumber Salad w/ Avocado-Buttermilk Dressing

Appalachian Cucumber Buttermilk Salad

Cucumber + Radish Salad w/ Feta, Red Wine Vinegar + Buttermilk Dressing

Nasturtium Butter + Nasturtium Vinegar

Nasturtium Butter w/ Orange Zest + Chili

Sirloin Steak w/ Nasturtium Butter

Chicken w/ Parsley Goat Cheese Butter

Goat Cheese Pasta Carbonara


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SPRING 2018, WEEK 9

Michael Celozzi


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WHAT'S IN THE BAG


A complete list of the contents of the CSA share this week

From Friends

  • Salanova Butter Lettuce - Gardens on Air / Rainbow City, Alabama
  • English Peas - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Hothouse Beefsteak Tomatoes- Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • Savoy Cabbage - Belle Meadow Farm / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Kohlrabi - Belle Meadow Farm / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Red Spring Onions - Belle Meadow Farm / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Multigrain Batard - Hinkel's / Birmingham, Alabama
  • Baby Vidalia Onions - Valdosta, Georgia
  • Strawberries - Voigt Farms / Cullman, Alabama

From Stone Hollow

  • Arugula
  • Chicory + Dandelion Mix
  • Turnips
  • Honeysuckle Marinated Goat Cheese

Milk Share

  • Stone Hollow Farmstead / Harpersville, Alabama

Cheese and/or Yogurt

  • Ski Queen Brunost - Tine / Norway


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SPRING 2018, WEEK 9

Michael Celozzi

ARTISAN PROFILE


Gardens on Air

Space Age Chard; Rainbow CIty, Alabama

Once upon a time, we might have heard of plants growing without soil and thought that maybe it was something too high-tech, something that might only happen on Mars, or with a bunch of chemicals. But in actuality, growing crops hydroponically has been around for centuries with some even pointing to Sir Francis Bacon’s mention of it in his 1627 tome, A Natural History. True enough, some plants seem to particularly thrive, growing in nutrient-rich water, either flat or in towers.

Gardens on Air owners Lee and LeeAnn Harrison raise a number of crops hydroponically and are thrilled to offer these through the Stone Hollow Farmstead CSA. We recently talked with these hydroponic farmers about the benefits of using this method.

What are the advantages to growing hydroponically?

We typically grow Hydroponic Salanova Buttercrunch and Hydroponic REX Bibb Buttercrunch Lettuces.  We also grow Hydroponic Swiss Chard.  We are able to grow (plants) about 40% - 50% faster growing hydroponically, and because we utilize our greenhouses year-round, we are able to produce regularly and consistently. That results in reliable crop production at consistent prices. We prefer using the Deep Water Method of Hydroponic Farming due to its consistent water temperatures year round.  There are some plants that do better in large tables, such as lettuce, and there are some plants that do better in smaller tables such as Swiss Chard.  The Tower Method that we used to use all the time is AirGrown Towers, which is proprietary.

Have you always been a farmer? Have you always farmed this way? What has surprised you most about farming this way?

I was not a farmer until July 2010, and even then I wasn’t what you considered a "farmer."

My father had been diagnosed with cancer, and my brother and I wanted to try some new farming techniques so that we could provide him with produce that wasn’t laced with the chemicals so often found in the mainstream grocery stores.  We both came up with the name “Gardens On Air,” and it was a play on words because we decided we wanted to grow in Vertical Aeroponic Towers.  We bought our very first Aeroponic Towers and put them in Albertville, AL.  We went through all the required certifications, and we were honored to be the first certified USDA Organic Commercial Aeroponic Farm in the United States. And we're also the first hydroponic lettuce farm to be allowed in the State of Alabama Farm to School Program. We've been in Marshall County schools for months and will be in Colbert County schools starting May 14th!

I was a police officer from 1992 until 2016.  I never in my wildest dreams thought I would be farming for a living.  Once I retired from law enforcement, I drove a truck for about a year.  But all the while – well, since 2010 -- we had a greenhouse using Aeroponics, Hydroponics, and NFT growing.  We also learned how to grow sprouts and microgreens utilizing UV technology. 

In January of 2017, we took things to the next level with our business so that we could have a more full family life, help our church community, help our feeding groups of the community, and ultimately provide veterans suffering from PTSD with a safe, fulfilling place to work. 

What’s surprised me about farming this way was the ability to grow so much and do it year round without having to use all the pesticides and chemicals that other companies use. 

We appreciate this partnership Stone Hollow Farmstead has with Gardens on Air.

Us too! We started selling to the CSA last year; this is such a great group of local farmers that we thought it would be a great partnership. Every single person that I talk to at Stone Hollow Farmstead is warm, friendly, and energetic.  I absolutely love delivering our products to them just to hang out. 

What does it feels like to see ‘Gardens On Air’ on local menus and popping up on Instagram feeds?

Seeing our food on local menus and gaining popularity has been such an honor.  It’s almost unreal sometimes, but my ultimate goal is to succeed to the best of my ability so that I can give back to our community.  I smile each and every time I see someone share our website, Facebook, pictures, or anything else.  It’s very satisfying. 

Phone

Website

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter


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SPRING 2018, WEEK 8

Michael Celozzi

Kohlrabi as in Coleslaw

Kohlrabi is one of those oft-overlooked vegetables that does not seem to have gained traction in mainstream supermarkets but is beloved by chefs when in season. Chicago Chef Stephanie Izard might well be kohlrabi’s biggest fan, showcasing it often at her Girl & the Goat restaurant in a butternut squash kohlrabi salad or kohlrabi salad with blueberries.  A member of the brassica family with origins in Germany and Italy, the slightly-sweet kohlrabi is related to other cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and cabbage. Keeping this ‘family tree’ in mind will inform your recipe choices.  

As the temperatures are still a wee bit cooler, you might opt to roast ½”-thin slices of kohlrabi, tossed with some sliced fennel, smashed garlic, a little olive oil, salt and pepper and serve alongside roasted chicken (your own or a quick rotisserie pick-up). Or pull out that mandoline or spiral-slicer and make kohlrabi ribbons. Sauté these quickly in browned butter and fold into fresh-cooked pasta, chopped herbs, top with a little ricotta salata – a happy match to grilled pork chops or halibut.

Need more inspiration? Shredded kohlrabi is the perfect base for your favorite slaw – toss with matchstick-sized pieces of crisp apples, lemon juice, good French Dijon mustard, a few Marcona almonds, (a tablespoon of mayonnaise here wouldn’t be a bad idea either). Or make a Greek slaw with fresh dill and feta and a dollop of Greek yogurt, kosher salt and pepper.

We can’t wait to hear how you decide to use your kohlrabi from this week’s CSA! Leave us a note on our Facebook page or tag us in your posts, #StoneHollowFarmstead #SHFCSA #TuesdayTable.

Kohlrabi Inspiration from Martha Stewart

GIRL & THE GOAT RECIPES

Butternut Squash + Kohlrabi Salad

Kohlrabi Salad w/ Blueberries


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WHAT'S IN THE BAG


A complete list of the contents of the CSA share this week

From Friends

  • Asparagus - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Hothouse Cucumbers - Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • Green Tomatoes - Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • Shiitake Mushrooms - Grandview Farm / Montevallo, Alabama 
  • Kohlrabi - Belle Meadow Farm / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Red Spring Onions - Belle Meadow Farm / Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Dinner Rolls - Hinkel's / Birmingham, Alabama
  • Pinto Beans - South Alabama
  • Okra - Florida
  • Chard - Gardens On Air / Gadsden, Alabama + Stone Hollow Farmstead / Harpersville, Alabama

From Stone Hollow

  • Arugula
  • Baby Kale
  • Sorrel - add chopped into a vinaigrette as an herb, tossed as a green in a salad, or stirred into a soup / imparts a fresh lemon flavor; more info: What do I do with sorrel?
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Cow's Milk Yogurt
  • Purple Daikon + Easter Egg Radishes
  • Amish Butter

Milk Share

  • Working Cow Dairy / Slocomb, Alabama

Cheese and/or Yogurt

  • Kunik Cow's + Goat's Milk Blend Triple Cream - Nettle Meadow Farm / Warrensburg, New York


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SPRING 2018, WEEK 7

Michael Celozzi

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WHAT'S IN THE BAG


A complete list of the contents of the CSA share this week

From Friends

  • Hothouse Cucumbers - Greenleaf Nursery / Joppa, Alabama
  • Shiitake Mushroom - Grandview Farm / Montevallo, Alabama
  • Pink Lady Peas - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Shallots - Habersham Farms / Mentone, Alabama
  • Sweet Potatoes - Heron Hollow Farms / Maplesville, Alabama + Spinks' Farms / Hayden, Alabama
  • Strawberries - Mountain View Orchards / Jemison, Alabama
  • Fresh Pasta Noodle Sheet - Corey Hinkel / Birmingham, Alabama - keep refrigerated until ready to use; cut in desired shapes (tagliatelle, lasagna cut to the size of your pan, garganelli, or ravioli); keep surface and hands well floured while using egg wash to seal ravioli; there's no need to pre-boil pasta for lasagna, just use a decent amount of sauce and bake for at least 1 hour; for pastas, cook in boiling water for 2 minutes; more info: Hand Cut Pasta

From Stone Hollow

  • Easter Egg Radishes
  • Broccoli Rabe - make sure to give a good wash
  • Tokyo Bekana, Kale, and Spinach Mixed Greens
  • Dandelions
  • Chicory and Pimento Pistou - similar to a pesto but with roasted peppers and without nuts; would be great over pasta or orzo, spread on a sandwich, or topping a soup
  • Buttermilk
  • Herbs de Provence Marinated Goat Cheese

Milk Share

  • Stone Hollow Farmstead / Harpersville, Alabama

Cheese and/or Yogurt

  • Smokey Blue - Rogue Creamery / Central Pointe, Oregon
  • Cheddar - Tillamook / Tillamook, Oregon
  • Plain Cow's Milk Yogurt - Stone Hollow Farmstead / Harpersville, Alabama

Recipes From Friends and Family

Ranch er, Farmstead Dressing

Those dry ranch dressing packets certainly have their place in the kitchen (we’re looking at you slow cooker, with your Mississippi Pot Roast and Santa Fe Soup recipes…), but fresh vegetables demand a fresh dressing. And what better way to add some zing to their zang with a homemade dressing!

This is a most forgiving recipe that you can adapt to your family’s taste buds but start by simply stirring together the following:

(yields about 8 servings)

INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ cup plain whole milk yogurt
  • ½ cup Stone Hollow Farmstead buttermilk
  • ¼ cup good mayonnaise
  • juice and zest of one large lemon
  • 1 clove garlic, grated or minced
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced (white and light green parts only)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs of your choice (we like chives, basil, parsley)
  • kosher salt + freshly ground pepper, to taste

Easter egg radishes and crisp cucumbers love this dressing. So do tender lettuce leaves and slender green beans. Roasted potatoes and beef tenderloin are happy with it too.

Wanna get a  little crazy? Try folding in some finely chopped arugula to the dressing. It adds a peppery kick that sugar snap peas adore.



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